Nanjing Part B May 1

On Saturday morning

Presidential Palace. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presidential_Palace_(Nanjing)

We started out by visiting the Presidential Palace, where the Nationalist government operated from 1927 until the Japanese attacks in 1937-38. Prior to this use, it had been an imperial compound, resembling the Imperial City in Beijing is some ways, but smaller. It was established during the Ming dynasty about 600 years ago as a ducal palace. After, capture of Nanjing by Taiping forces in 1854, the ducal palace was expanded and converted to the palace for Hong Xiuquan, the leader of the Taiping Rebellion, as his “Palace of the Heavenly King.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Xiuquan The first photo shows a model of the compound as it existed in 1864.

000 Model of Palace of Heavenly King

Model of Palace of the Heavenly King

001 Deb and Bill at entry to Presidential Palace 002 Secret Room of Heavenly King

                         Entrance to Grounds                                     Private Study of Hong Xiuquan,

                                                                                                                  the Heavenly King

004 Unheavenly Queen and King at throne 005 Heavenly Cranes

                                 Hong Xiuquan Throne                                           Heavenly Cranes by the Throne

Qing forces recaptured Nanjing and defeated Taiping forces in 1864, and Hong committed suicide. The victorious Qing commander razed the compound and rebuilt it as offices for the Governor-general of that region. In 1927, when the Nationalist government established headquarters in Nanjing, some of the buildings were used for government offices, and this was designated as the Presidential Palace. A large amount of damage resulted from Japanese occupation after 1937. However, the offices of President Chiang Kai-shek (Jiang Zhoutai) and his government officials, were restored and preserved when the presidential palace and Palace of the Heavenly King was restored as a museum in the late 1980s.

006 Chiang Kaishek Office 007 VP Li Zongren's Conference room

                                                      Chiang Kaishek Office                               VP Li Zongren Conference Room

008 Small garden outside Presidential ofices 009 Small garden at presidential office

Small Garden at Presidential Offices        

010 Small garden at presidential offic 011 Small garden at presidential offic

Small Garden at Presidential Offices

012 Small garden at presidential offic 013 Small garden at presidential offic

Small Garden at Presidential Offices

016 Statue of Sun Yatsen and wife Soong Chingling in Small garden at presidential offic 017 Statue of Sun Yatsen and daughters Sun Wan and Sun yan in small garden

                                              Sun Yatsen & wife, Soong Chingling                          Sun Yatsen & daughters,

                                                                                                                             Sun Wan & Sun Yan

019 Lady doing silk brocade in Small garden at presidential offic 020 Lady doing silk embroidery Small garden at presidential offic

Lady Embroidering Silk

 

We visited the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanjing_Massacre_Memorial_Hall

http://www.nj1937.org/english/default.asp

The memorial hall was established in 1985 to memorialize the victims of the massacre of civilians by Japanese military in 1937-38. More than 300,000 victims have been documented in Nanjing alone, but similar atrocities occurred throughout the eastern part of China prior to the end of World War II.

This sobering memorial causes quiet and deep reflection on the capacity of humans to commit unspeakably atrocious acts against other humans, just as does the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (http://www.ushmm.org/) in Washington, DC, and the many similar memorials. Understandably, photography within the hall is prohibited so we have the photos of the exterior only.

021 ENtry to the Museum of the Nanjing Massacre 022 Inner Courtyard of the Museum of the Nanjing Massacre

                                   Entry to the Memorial Hall plaza                    Inner courtyard of the Memorial Hall

023 Plaque at museum entry of the Museum of the Nanjing Massacre  

Descriptive Plaque at entry

In the afternoon, we visited the Nanjing Temple of Confucius. http://www.njfzm.com/fzmen/fzm.htm

The temple complex was built in 1034 during the Song dynasty. Distilling many photos down to a few, those follow:

028 Confucius Temple in Nanjing --  entry gate 029 Confucius Temple in Nanjing -- just inside gate

                                           Confucius Temple Gate                                         Inside the Gate

030 Confucius Temple in Nanjing -- Nanjing Brocade Inside Temple area, Nanjing Brocade example

 Zhonghua Gate. Nanjing city wall was a formidable defensive structure when it was built. The "Gate of China", or southern Gate is the Zhonghuamen.   http://www.njfzm.com/fzmen/zhmcb.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gate_of_China,_Nanjing According the the Wikipedia artcile, "The city wall of Nanjing was built from 1360 to 1386 under the founder of the Ming dynasty, the Hongwu Emperor Zhu Yuanzhang. In 1368, Zhu Yuanzhang was crowned Emperor, and made Nanjing his capital. The southern and eastern sections of the old city wall from the Tang dynasty were incorporated into the new wall."

As these articles illustrate the Zhonghuamen was a constructed as a massive trap consisting of several interior courts that could trap invaders, as well as housing and supply storage for many soldiers and horses. Currently, in the central courtyard is a Penzai garden.   Penjing means “landscape in a pot,” and penzai refers to the small trees grown in pots.  The oldest in this garden was said to be 400 years old, and the oldest we saw (in Suzhou, was 800 years old!  Please forgive me the number of tree photos, but I think these awesome potted plants and their care takers deserve a huge amoiunt of appreciation.   I know for a fact that I cannot do it – even one year.  I have way too many little dead trees to prove my lack of attentiveness.  sighHere are the photos:

033 Zhongguo gate -- approaching entry to gate 034 Zhongguo gate -- entrance

                                                On way to the Gate                                             Entrance to Gate

036 Zhonghua gate -- about mid-way through 038 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

                                        Within the gate complex                     Tree in penzai garden in middle courtyard

039 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees 040 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

                 Tree in penzai garden                                          Tree in penzai garden

042 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees with the gardener 043 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

                              Tree in penzai garden, with Master gardener                   Tree in penzai garden

044 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees 045 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

Trees in penzai garden

046 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees 047 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

  Trees in penzai garden

   048 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees 049 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Penzai trees

    Trees in penzai garden

051 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees 050 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

Trees in penzai garden 

 052 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees 051 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

Trees in penzai garden

053 Zhonghua gate -- mid court -- Bonzai trees

Tree in penzai garden

 

After the the Penjing garden, we saw the rest of the gate.

054 Zhonghua gate -- outer court 055 Zhonghua gate -- outer court

                                 South-most Court within the gate                     South-most Court within the gate

056 Zhonghua gate -- top looking back over the inner courts 058 Zhonghua gate -- top

Atop the city wall section, looking north:        Top of the city wall section of gate

                                                 note courtyards

059 Zhonghua gate -- top looking south 060 Zhonghua gate -- top looking east

                                       Top of wall looking south                              Top of the wall looking east

061 Zhonghua gate -- top looking north east toward Purple Mountain 062 Zhonghua gate -- top looking North over the city

                                  Top of the wall looking Northeast                     Top of the wall looking north

                                      Purple Mountain in distance

063 Zhonghua gate -- top looking down at Deb on Soldier ramp 064 Zhonghua gate -- on Soldier ramp

                                Top of the wall, Deb waiting below                             Deb visiting while waiting

Train to Suzhou.   After dinner at Pizza Hut, we went to the Nanjing Train Station to catch the train to Suzhou. As is so often the case, we met a lot of people there who 1) wanted to practice English, 2) wondered what manner of old foreigners we were, or wanted to be sure we didn’t miss our train!  It was fun as always!  We had a great, quiet, fast trip!

065 Nanjing Traain station 066 on train from Nanjing to Suzhou

                                        Nanjing Train Station                                          Our Coach on the train

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